Assembling the Crankcases

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Written by Randy Fox   
Saturday, 03 November 2007

Introduction

Crankcase, right, empty, Yamaha Road Star

This article is one of a series that describes how to disassemble, work on, and reassemble the Road Star engine. This particular article shows how to reassemble the engine’s crank, transmission, and oil pump assemblies into the crankcase. It also shows how to put the crankcases back together, and install the assembly back into the frame. See the Complete Engine Tear Down, Orientation article in this website for details.

Be sure you refer to the service manual through all phases of this project.

I highly recommend you take lots of pictures as assembly proceeds. There have been several occasions when I've wanted to review some part of the engine internals to satisfy my worry-wart mentality, to show to a supplier that I installed their parts correctly, and to make it easier to explain how to do something to a fellow Road Star owner.

Start by taking some photos of the empty cases.

 

 

Beginning Tips

 

Lubrication Tip: There are many opinions for the proper way to pre-lube an engine. Unless you plan on starting your bike within a few days from now, I recommend using a good quality assembly lube on most of the places the service manual would have you use motor oil or gear oil.

Assembly lube sticks to parts much longer, giving you time to put your bike back together properly, and still offering lubrication during those first, critical, 30 seconds of start-up. This way, no parts are dry for the initial start-up, even if it takes a month before the engine is started. Yet oil journals are not clogged by too much assembly lube.

Disclaimer: What works for me, may not work for you. Use your own judgment.

 

Torque Tip: (for all critical bolt torquing) First, using a criss-cross pattern, tighten bolts as needed to draw the piece in until it has seated and all bolts are just begining to tighten. Then continue tightening bolts evenly, roughly 1/4 turn at a time, until you've reached the proper torque. Next, back off a little on all the bolts and then re-torque. This will ensure that the piece has fully seated--without binding--and the bolts are pulling evenly.

 

Stainless Bolts Tip: If you are using stainless steel bolts, remember the following:

  • Stainless bolts stretch less than steel ones. Tighten them approximately 20% less. Refer to your supplier for details.
  • Always use anti-seize.



 
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