Setting up and Adjusting your TPS

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Written by Steve Graham (GRAM)   
Friday, 11 June 2004

The TPS adaptor on the carburetor is responsible for reporting the position of your throttle to the ignition (ignitor).  The ignition uses this information to adjust the timing curve on the bike to match driving conditions. 

We have seen some broken TPS's that failed to do so, and the bikes they came in on were somewhat sluggish to drive.  To assist those who may need to check, adjust, or replace their TPS adaptors we put together this brief paraphrase of the instructions in the service manual.

If you are not comfortable working with a Multimeter, we suggest getting some assistance from someone who is.

Check your TPS:

  • With the TPS cable disconnected from the bikeís harness, youíll see that the wires from the TPS are Blue, Yellow, and Black. Using an Ohmmeter (the digital type is best), measure the resistance between the terminals for the Blue and Black wires. It should be between 4k ~ 6k Ohm at 68-degrees F. Temperature IS a factor, so youíll find it will vary some with different temps. Throttle position is NOT a factor in this measurement.
  • Measure the resistance between the Yellow and Black terminals, with the throttle closed. If it does not fall within the desired range, then by loosening the M4 screws holding the TPS to the bracket, you can rotate the TPS until it shows the correct reading on the Ohmmeter. With the right setting established, retighten the screws. So far, I've found that every TPS I've installed has needed a setting of 650 to 675-Ohm. If you measure the resistance between the Yellow and Black terminals while opening the throttle from idle to full open, you should see a progressive change from the set point to a maximum between 4k ~ 6k-Ohm.

Not all digital ohmmeters are setup the same. Some have a multiplier on the LCD for each scale (X10, X100, X1K, and X10K), but yours may have range limits that just indicate the highest limit of each setting on the dial. With that type of ohmmeter you'd use the 10-K or 20-K scale (whichever it comes with) while reading the blue & black wires (which just means that 10,000 or 20,000 Ohms is that scale's greatest resolution). The reading taken from the blue & black wires is the maximum resistance of the TPS and isn't effected by throttle position. When you measure the resistance between the blue and black wires you should get something in the neighborhood of 5,000 Ohms (give or take about 500). Multiply that number times the standard of .13 to .15 (I just use .14) and the result is the resistance to set the TPS position to, while reading the yellow and black wires. With ohmmeters that have range limits, you'd use the 1K or 2K scale (whichever it has) to set it while connected to the yellow and black wires. The yellow and black wires show the variable resistance of the TPS depending on throttle position and what you're doing is setting the nominal resistances at idle.

Once it's set, if you open the throttle you'll see the resistance across those wires climb between 4,000 to 6,000 Ohms. When you drop the throttle back to idle, it should return to the previously set reading (plus or minus 25 Ohms). It'll vary some, so don't sweat it if it doesn't return to exactly what you set it to.



Questions should be asked in our forum (Use discuss link below). The forum is very active and you stand a good chance of getting your questions answered there. If you would like to leave feedback for the author, or have additional information you think will benefit others, please use the comment section at the bottom of this page.

Discuss this article on the forums. (2 posts)


DISCLAIMER: This information and procedure is provided as a courtesy and is for informational purposes only.  Neither the publishers nor the authors accept any responsibility for the accuracy, applicability, or suitability of this procedure.  You assume all risks associated with the use of this information.  NEITHER THE PUBLISHERs NOR THE AUTHORs SHALL IN ANY EVENT BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, PUNITIVE, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, OF ANY NATURE ARISING OUT OF OR IN ANY WAY CONNECTED WITH THE USE OR MISUSE OF THIS INFORMATION OR LACK OF INFORMATION.  Any type of modification or service work on your motorcycle should always be performed by a professional mechanic. If performed incorrectly, this procedure may endanger the safety of you and others on your motorcycle and possibly invalidate your manufacturerís warranty.


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  Comments (5)
Written by Timmay4, on 07-02-2017 14:02
Will a faulty TPS cause the bike to misfire and run extremely rough, sometimes stall?
Needs some more help with the tps sensor
Written by speedone, on 07-15-2013 14:38
I everyone it's been awhile since i been on here. I just bought my second roadstar and am having some problems. My last one was a 2004 and now i found a 2007 still in the crate brand new. This bike isn't as quiet and smooth as my old one. here is what i found, I now have 700 plus miles on this bike and it has a lot of knocking and pinging plus my fuel mileage is only 28mpg not close to the 47 out of the old one. I looked into the tps sensor since its the only thing to control the timing. and this post suggest 650 to 675. mine was at 850. i turned it as far as i can and only got it down to 715. And i can tell a differance in the noise of the motor and maybe power. Havent had a chance to check fuel mileage. Why was this at 850 on a brand new bike, And will it hurt to leave it at the 715 setting. what is my next step. Thanks in advance.
Written by gasboy, on 08-21-2010 12:03
engine will not speed up synk carbs
Would like to know the symptoms if TPS o
Written by Hay Bay Woody, on 08-03-2008 10:10
Can a poorly adjusted TPS stop the Roadstar from pulling smoothly at low RPMS
When I shift into 5th gear at the "manual recomended" shift point, my Roadstar will not accelerate smoothly.
Part number for TPS sensor
Written by aeropup, on 07-11-2008 15:25
Where does one track down the part number for the Throttle position sensor on a 2006 roady? I have been all over the internet and can't find that darn P/N. I am going to a 42 HSR Mikuni and do not want to use the one on my stock carb in case I want to sell it. If you have any suggestions for a vendor that would be icing on the cake! 
 
Thanks

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