Replace your Rear Brake Pads

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Written by Mr Tidy   
Friday, 11 June 2004

Reprinted by Permission from Mr Tidy's Tech Tips

with a note on the Front Pads at the bottom of this procedure
As with any maintenance procedure if you don't feel comfortable
performing the job on your bike, let the pro's do it.

Out riding this morning I heard a unfamiliar sound when applying the
back brake and knew I had just hit metal.
Oop's I came home and changed them, at 33,670 miles
It would be wise to change the OEM by at least 30,000 miles
depending on your riding style this might differ.
The front pads still had plenty of pad left as shown by the Picture
at the end of this article.
Enjoy, I hope this is of some help to you,
Mr. Tidy

Depending on your exhaust, you might have to remove it to obtain access to the rear caliper.

Remove the two caliper mounting bolts
(12 mm hex head socket)

Remove the brake pad cover
(A black plastic cover)

Remove the Clips from the Pad Pins

Remove the Pad Pins

The Brake Pad Spring lifts up (Denote that the spring has an arrow designating the direction of rotation of the rotor upon the top, see location of arrow 3 pictures below this one)

Remove the Brake Pads  
The Caliper pistons collect dirt and this should be cleaned off to reduce the chances of it entering the caliper body and causing a failure of the caliper. I used a solvent and a scotch brite pad to clean the pistons.

Take a piece of small diameter hose place it on the end of the bleeder screw to drain the brake fluid into a container.

Loosen the bleeder screw and push the pistons back into the caliper body till all four are retracted.

Tighten the bleeder screw.


You can clearly see the remaining two
pistons still extended


Both sets of pistons fully
retracted into the caliper body


 
Place new pads into the caliper body,  

 

Important

Re-apply the Brake Pad Spring observing the direction of rotation arrow upon the top of the Pad spring.

Re-apply the pad pins
Re-apply the pad clips
Re-apply the pad cover
 
You are now ready to install the Caliper back on to the frame.  
Check the brake fluid level in the reservoir and fill if needed.
Re-apply the reservoir cap.
Place your hose on the bleeder screw and into a container to retain spilled fluid.
Pump your brake pedal several times and hold the pedal.
While holding pressure on brake pedal, loosen bleeder screw, fluid and excess air will expel from bleeder screw hose into container, hold pedal fully forward and tighten bleeder screw.
Pump brake pedal again and repeat process till all the air is expelled from the brake lines and the pedal is firm and not spongy.
Refill Fluid Reservoir and check operation of rear brake.
 

 
The Picture to the right is a set of front pads with 33,670 miles on them, they have plenty of pad left as you can see by the depth grooves. Both calipers looked the same.



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DISCLAIMER: This information and procedure is provided as a courtesy and is for informational purposes only.  Neither the publishers nor the authors accept any responsibility for the accuracy, applicability, or suitability of this procedure.  You assume all risks associated with the use of this information.  NEITHER THE PUBLISHERs NOR THE AUTHORs SHALL IN ANY EVENT BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, PUNITIVE, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, OF ANY NATURE ARISING OUT OF OR IN ANY WAY CONNECTED WITH THE USE OR MISUSE OF THIS INFORMATION OR LACK OF INFORMATION.  Any type of modification or service work on your motorcycle should always be performed by a professional mechanic. If performed incorrectly, this procedure may endanger the safety of you and others on your motorcycle and possibly invalidate your manufacturer’s warranty.


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  Comments (10)
Written by Starship, on 12-17-2013 09:50
Just use a wide screw driver to pry the old pads apart. No need to bleed the brakes if you dont open the bleeder screw. remove overflow fluid as it builds up in brake reservoir.
Written by Cocacolaguy, on 10-24-2013 20:29
I always use oem pads and have 84000 squeak free miles on my 2000 R*.
rear brake fluid
Written by toni08, on 03-14-2012 10:13
Is it necessary to change the fluid when changing pads? 
thank you. 
toni
New Brake Squeek
Written by brickbird, on 05-06-2011 21:49
There must be missing parts the mechanic did not put in to prevent squeaking. I do not recommend you spray anything as this may cause loss of braking power.
Stop the squeaking
Written by VinceJE, on 11-04-2009 15:52
Be sure your mechanic (or you) uses disc brake pad adhesive (the blue stuff) on the back of the pads. Permatex makes an aerosol spray version that coats them good and has enough for many brake jobs or you can purchase small, one application tube of it. I use it even if the pad manufacturer claims they are "squeak free" pads.
HOW ABOUT THE REAR DISC?
Written by SPUDWRENCH12, on 12-09-2008 14:34
SHOULDN'T THE DISC BE SCUFFED BEFORE WE PUT THE NEW PADS ON THE BACK?
bleeding brakes
Written by BIGBEN1, on 06-10-2008 16:24
I reverse bleed mine by using a large syringe 
1)Remove approximatly 2/3rds of fluid in reservoir. 
2)Fill syringe with proper brake fluid.(clear tubing can be found at most hardware stores) 
3)Bleed bubbles from syringe and tubing then attach tubing to bleed nipple open bleeder nipple and gently force fluid into brake system watch for bubbles in reservoir when they stop close bleeder nipple and try operating brake. This should work. GOOD LUCK
brake fluids ???
Written by lionRstar06, on 02-26-2008 19:07
Hi you all star guys .  
I am wondering ??? , Which brake fluids you all using for front brakes .  
Reason I am asking, I am changing 12.5 inch ape handle bar. I got new longer brake hose. So wondering which brake fluids shall I get ??  
appreation to respond my ?? thanks pal !!! by Bill
Rear Brake Noise/squeak
Written by kwz3, on 11-19-2007 17:11
As a 28 year certified auto mechanic, and very versed in motorcycles as well I can only suggest that you use OEM brake pads when replacing. I have found tremendous varieties of noise with aftermarkets and no noise with OEM. Just a suggestion
still with the brake problems
Written by keith57, on 08-07-2006 23:44
i have tried several things but still have brake noise .let me say that this is a constant noise and does not stop when i put on the brakes. any ideas ?

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